Drug Classifications and Schedules Explained

Drugs and chemicals are separated into five classifications based on a variety of factors. These classifications, or schedules, are used by medical professionals, drug manufacturers, and the government to protect the public from potentially dangerous or addictive drugs.

Whenever prescription drugs, narcotics, or controlled substances are mentioned, a “class” or “schedule” is typically included. Keep reading to learn more about the specifics of drug schedules and how they are determined.

What are drug classifications? Drug classifications were first put in place by the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) in the 1970s. Since that time, the DEA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were named responsible for determining whether or not substances are fit for medical use.

Both legal and illegal substances are controlled by the CSA, which provides an outline for the five classifications of drugs. Each classification comes with its own set of regulations. Regulations for drugs include possession, manufacturing, importation, use, and distribution. The CSA does not include alcohol or tobacco products among the classified substances.

The Truth About Cocaine Addiction & Recovery

In 1986, an American music group by the name of General Kane released a song describing the painful and consuming nature of drug addiction. The fictional Nathan “Applejack” Lewis came from a loving, two-parent home, but after being exposed to drugs, his life was turned upside down. He stole and even prostituted his wife … and himself … to maintain his drug addiction. There is nothing glamorous about cocaine … in any form. There is no grey area or silver lining when it comes to cocaine usage. It is a dangerous, illegal drug that should be avoided at all costs. Let’s jump straight in and get to the facts.

What is cocaine?

The USDEA categorizes drugs into a number of categories according to the potency and potential for addiction. Cocaine is listed as a Schedule II drug, which is defined as a drug which has the potential for abuse and physical dependence.

Cocaine can appear as a fine, white, crystal powder or as a solid, rock crystal. It can be snorted through the nose, injected into the bloodstream via a needle, smoked, or rubbed into the gums to induce a high that involves feelings of increased energy and alertness. It is an extremely addictive and destructive drug. Cocaine increases the arousal activity in the brain, resulting in feelings of invincibility, loss of appetite, and sexual arousal.