Suboxone Withdrawal: Symptoms & Treatments

Suboxone is a medication used to treat addiction to opiates like heroin, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Suboxone contains both buprenorphine and naloxone, and doctors prescribe it to people in addiction treatment to help alleviate opiate withdrawal and cravings.

That being said, buprenorphine itself is a partial opiate, meaning that it can create euphoria, much like heroin, although to a lesser extent. While the effects of Suboxone may not be as strong as with heroin, people still may abuse this medication and become addicted to it. After all, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), labels Suboxone as a Schedule III Controlled Substance, indicating that users can become highly psychologically dependent upon it and develop low to moderate physical dependence upon the drug.

Unfortunately, with dependence comes withdrawal, which means that people may experience uncomfortable symptoms when detoxing off of Suboxone, whether they are using it legally as a doctor prescribes or abusing it in some fashion. Learning more about Suboxone withdrawal can help you to understand this condition better.

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Benzodiazepine Withdrawal: Symptoms, Dependence, Treatment, Timelines and Types

According to Harvard Medical School, benzodiazepines are a class of medications primarily used to treat anxiety, insomnia, and seizures. They work by increasing the activity of a neurotransmitter, or brain chemical, called GABA, which slows activity in the nervous system and produces a calming effect. These medications can be useful for treating anxiety and related issues, but with long-term use, people may become addicted to them and undergo withdrawal if they attempt to stop using benzodiazepines. It is critical to understand the risk of addiction and withdrawal that comes with benzodiazepine use in order to make informed choices about the best course of action for treating conditions like anxiety.

Benzodiazepine Dependence

Before learning about benzodiazepine withdrawal, it is first important to understand why these drugs are addictive and lead to dependence. The reason for benzodiazepine dependence is that the brain and body adapt to the presence of these drugs, and they become accustomed to increased GABA activity. This means that over time, the body cannot produce enough GABA on its own, and it becomes dependent upon benzodiazepines to increase GABA activity and calm the body. Once the body becomes dependent on benzodiazepines, if a person stops using these drugs, there will not be enough GABA activity to maintain normal functioning. This causes the uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms associated with benzodiazepines.

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3 Most Common Fears That People Have Before Getting Clean & Sober

There are certain people who aren’t able to drink. They can’t handle alcohol. Maybe you are one of the people who get out of control when you drink. You might feel the need to drink to handle a trauma from your past. Maybe alcohol & drugs negatively affect every aspect of your life. If this is the case, you are not alone. There are millions of others just like you. Now it is up to you to decide whether you are going to get sober. This can be scary. Many people have fears that keep them from getting sober. Knowing more about these fears might give you the boost that you need to start your sobriety and recovery journey in Florida.

1. You Won’t Have Fun in Your Life Once You Are Sober

Many people believe that they won’t have any fun in their life once they are sober. This is a fear that many alcoholics & addicts have. The problem is that you can’t keep drinking. When you think about it, the “fun” that you have when you are drunk is not real fun at all. It is an imagined type of fun that you tell yourself you are having so that you can continue drinking. Once you wake up with a hangover or after doing something that you regret, you realize that the drunk lifestyle is not actually fun.

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6 Reasons Not to Detox from Alcohol on Your Own

If you have made the choice to get sober, that is amazing. Many people live their entire lives and never even admit they have an alcohol addiction. You are already on the right path and you should be extremely proud of yourself for this decision. Now that you have made this decision, you can decide to detox with an outpatient detox program, inpatient detox program, or detox on your own at home.

With this being said, there are some things that you need to think about when deciding where you are going to detox. You need to consider your safety, the comfort of getting sober, and your alcohol abuse history. You should also consider your past, current, and future health. While taking these things into consideration, it is helpful to know some of the reasons why you shouldn’t detox from alcohol on your own.

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woman helps woman detox from alcohol

How to Help Someone Detoxing from Alcohol

Supporting a friend or family member through detox from alcohol can be a very difficult process. While you want to help your friend through their struggle, alcohol detox requires a lot of patience and preparation for all involved. Alcohol withdrawal can be very dangerous and even life-threatening, so it is crucial to learn as much as you can from a qualified medical professional.

Helping your friend or loved one recognize that they have an alcohol use disorder or dependence on alcohol is an important first step. However, alcohol detox is not something to enter lightly. Understanding the effects of alcohol detox and the symptoms of withdrawal can help you support your loved one through their journey of recovery.

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Top 10 Reasons to Get Clean and Sober

Life is full of challenges – no matter where you were born or where you’re headed, there will always be highs and lows that add together into the person you are today. For many, this rollercoaster can lead to some sort of addiction, whether that be addiction to drugs, alcohol, or the number of other dangerous addictions we see in our world today. The road to recovery can be long and challenging, especially without the right support systems put in place. Thankfully, there are hundreds of organizations in the United States (such as SAMHSA) designed to help those who struggle with addictions to come out on the other side stronger than before.

One of the most important things shared in many of these treatment programs is the constant reminder of why you are working toward becoming (and staying) sober. Without any reason to get clean and sober, it can be nearly impossible to force yourself out of the cycle. Here, we have compiled the top 10 reasons for getting clean and sober – if you or someone you know is suffering from addiction, brainstorm through these reasons as you construct your own, adding specific examples that apply to your individual situation.

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Loss in Recovery: A Personal Experience

Loss overall is never an easy circumstance to navigate. This can come in many shapes and forms, mainly because what we define as loss is entirely subjective- it’s personal to us based on our experiences with and the depths of our feelings toward whatever it is we find ourselves lacking. Some of the most common losses are those of relationships, the death of a loved one or even the loss of self. In recovery especially, loss can be felt on so many levels and because we are no longer numb, that loss can hurt like none other.

By the time I was beaten down enough to seek a different solution for my life, I certainly didn’t recognize myself. My physical appearance in regards to my health were on a fast-track to deterioration; I was sick, I looked sick and didn’t know how to get better. When it comes healing, I like to see it as a rebuilding process- the foundation of who we are is always there, even if it’s covered and buried by the debris of the wreckage of our pasts, it’s there. Getting back to bottom floor, carefully straightening up and working to rebuild again is a long and arduous process but it also teaches a vital lesson that we can carry forward to other facets of life; no matter how far we think we have fallen, what we think we have lost can, in most instances, be regained.

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Does Alcohol Withdrawal cause Hypertension (high blood pressure)?

It makes a lot of sense to start this talk by defining the sympathetic nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system (known in laymen’s terms as the “fight-or-flight” response) is the body’s activation of processes that prepare itself for demonstrative physical response. This is largely a reflexive response to new and foreign stimuli, and is in constant contact with the bloodstream to monitor the balance of needs. The actions of the sympathetic nervous system are counteracted by the body’s parasympathetic nervous system, or its resting response. A good way to think of this is as a gas (sympathetic) and brake (parasympathetic) in a motor vehicle.

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Understanding Alcohol Withdrawal – Treatment, Causes, Timeline & Dangers

When you make the decision to stop drinking, either gradually or suddenly, you may experience symptoms of withdrawal. While the exact symptoms of withdrawal will be different depending on the severity and longevity of addiction, there are some commonalities for withdrawal. Understanding the symptoms of withdrawal can help you prepare for the journey ahead. Keep reading to learn more about alcohol withdrawals and what to expect during the process.

What causes alcohol withdrawal?

Prolonged use of alcohol or alcohol abuse alters the brain’s chemistry. When copious amounts of alcohol are present or alcohol is used in high volumes, the body has to adapt. The mind adjusts to a new “normal” state with alcohol present. Once alcohol is removed, the body has to readjust to a new state of normal.

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Post-Acute Withdrawal Syndrome (PAWS): Symptoms, Treatment & Types

When most people think of drug and alcohol withdrawal, they probably picture the initial withdrawal symptoms that occur when a person stops using drugs or alcohol and undergoes the detox process. While these initial withdrawal symptoms can be unpleasant and intense, another form of withdrawal comes later. According to the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, a second form of withdrawal, called post-acute withdrawal syndrome (PAWS), includes symptoms that occur for several weeks or even months after a person stops using drugs and alcohol. Other names for this condition include post-withdrawal syndrome, prolonged withdrawal syndrome, or protracted withdrawal syndrome, and it most often occurs with alcohol, benzodiazepine, and opiate abuse.

Symptoms of Post-Acute Withdrawal

Post-acute withdrawal symptoms may vary based upon the substance from which a person is withdrawing. According to a report in CNS Drugs, post-acute withdrawal syndrome for alcohol typically involves the following symptoms:

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