Addiction at Work

There’s a stigma with addiction – that of the addict passing out in an alley somewhere, unable to move, barely able to function at all. While that image of addiction does come from a real place, there’s a far more prevalent face of addiction out in the world – that of the highly functioning professional. Drug & alcohol addiction knows no bounds. It is not a poor person’s disease, it does not care about race, religion, social status, or career. Addiction affects every tier of society. That fact can be very surprising to people on the fringes of the addiction disease. Below are the career fields that rank highest for addiction among the workforce. You’ll see that addiction really does run the gamut, and permeates some unexpected places.

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The Heroin Journey

“What’s going to happen to me?” It’s one of the most common questions we hear when the heroin addiction treatment process is in its beginning moments. And that makes perfect sense! Something that your body depends on to feel “good” and “normal” isn’t going to be available anymore. What does that mean for you? What will your body and mind go through? And what does a treatment facility do to help in that process?

While everyone’s treatment journey is unique, a few generalities exist. These include things that can be highlighted to help answer some of those burning questions about your journey from addiction to recovery, and what happens in between.

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5 Ways Drug Addicts Play the Victim Role

By the time addiction has become truly problematic, a person will come up with a bunch sophisticated defense mechanisms to continue feeding his/her addiction. One of these defense mechanisms is playing the victim role.

Why do addicts play the victim?

Knowingly playing the victim role helps an addict to control and influence the thoughts and feelings of others, most commonly parents and spouses. An addict hardly copes with their actions — they’re ashamed or afraid to acknowledge this and seek help — so they justifies their actions as a way of controlling the situation.

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Why Does Family Play Such an Important Role In Every Addict’s Journey?

Getting sober is an ongoing process which requires not only strong will power and a professional help, but also help from closed family.

One way to help your loved ones is finding good detox facility. Start by learning about their addiction and the different treatments available. If they’re open to it, offer to visit the place with them. Offer your help with anything that gets in the way of sobriety. Just don’t push anything! There’s no good in forcing an individual to seek treatment, one has to decide this alone.

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You Are Not Addicted to Alcohol. Unless…

Alcohol is the most commonly consumed addictive substance around the globe, and it’s becoming a bigger problem every day. Estimates are that more than 17 million people suffer from alcohol addiction globally. Several million people engage in binge drinking almost daily.

It’s hard to recognize the exact point when drinking alcohol becomes an addiction, but here are a few signs to help figure out whether you or someone you love have a drinking problem.

Physical signs of alcoholism

Are you (or someone close to you) shaking, sweating and feeling nauseous when you don’t drink alcohol? Are you unable to fall asleep without drinking? Persistent insomnia is a real sign of alcohol addiction. Do you need more and more alcohol to get that buzzing feeling that you’d get after two drinks just a while ago? Having high tolerance to alcohol is another common sign of addiction.

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Relapse Rates (or: How to Avoid Becoming A Statistic)

Over the past years, relapses have taken the lives of addicts and alcoholisms all around the world — people who have been struggling to live another day. Unfortunately, too many succumb to chemical dependency, despite measures taken by local and federal government against the opioid epidemic in the United States.

No one person or organization can be blamed solely for this rise in relapse rates. For many, getting clean is a long and messy process, and failure points are in abundance. Admitting is one thing, but accepting is what can prevent a relapse and lower relapse rates over time.

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man struggles with the signs of drug addiction and dependency

Signs of Drug Abuse, Dependency and Addiction

How to recognize signs of drug abuse and addiction

The answer is not a simple one, especially in the initial phase of drug consumption when neither the psychological nor the physical health of a person haven’t been disrupted, and they’re still trying to keep old habits and leave the impression that everything is fine. If you suspect that you or someone you love is having a problem with substance abuse, there’s a list of universally accepted symptoms.

According to the World Drug Report, 29.5 million people worldwide suffer from drug use disorders. Even the first use of an illicit drug qualifies as drug abuse. It usually starts willfully, and most commonly due to curiosity, boredom, stress or depression. Addiction is a strong urge to obtain the use of illicit drugs regardless of the consequences, and it’s a product of prolonged drug abuse.

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The Effects of Valium Addiction

Valium is often prescribed by a doctor to alleviate anxiety and panic attacks, in addition to other ailments. This drug works by slowing down brain activity and acting as a depressant. Since the use of the Valium results in a relaxed feeling, individuals may begin to abuse the drug in order to feel calm and reduce stress. However, valium addiction can lead to serious short term and long term effects, making it necessary to seek treatment and detoxification.

Short-Term Effects

Users of Valium can experience a short-term feeling of happiness and a feeling of drunkenness that is accompanied by a lack of coordination. However, once the effects of the drug begin to subside, and the brain function returns to its normal amount of activity, the individual can feel irritable and anxious. More serious effects include a rapid heart rate and possibly seizures.

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What are the Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawal?

Xanax is a calming drug typically prescribed by doctors to reduce the symptoms of anxiety by acting as a sedative for the central nervous system and brain. When used properly, the drug can effectively alleviate anxiety, but a growing number of people have been abusing it and taking the drug in large amounts and longer duration.

When an individual becomes dependent on Xanax and increases the frequency of usage, the withdrawal symptoms become more intense and difficult to deal with, making the person feel like they cannot be without it. Symptoms of withdrawal can include:

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2019 New Year’s Resolutions for People in Recovery

2018 is almost up and that means it is time to think of your goals for the new year! For the upcoming year, it is normal to wish to lose weight, save more, find a new love or make career changes. And what do all these resolutions have in common? These goals are made to improve the overall quality of one’s life. The only problem is these goals end up not being followed through because they aren’t personal enough and there is a lack of commitment.

For the new year, think of resolutions that are specific to you and that are something you are ready to commit to and see through during your journey to recovery. Here are four resolutions to get you started:

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